Summary of the giver chapter 9. The Giver Chapter 8 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts 2019-02-26

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The Giver Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

summary of the giver chapter 9

The Giver explained that Jonas was seeing the color red. He explained that before they went to sameness, there had been many colors, but they decided to take them all away. The Receiver welcomes Jonas as The Receiver of Memory, telling Jonas that he has been The Receiver for a long time, although he is less old than he looks, and that it will require his remaining strength to train Jonas. Since he can ask rude questions, he knows he could ask his Father whether or not he lied. Lily cannot wait for the next day and the beginning of her new responsibilities as an Eight.

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Brief Book Summary of by Lois Lowry

summary of the giver chapter 9

Jonas still doesn't understand exactly what that means. He is allowed to lie. Now that Jonas learns that lying is permitted for some people, he wonders whom he can trust. Jonas endures the rest of the Ceremony in horrible embarrassment and worry, wondering what he has done wrong. Father adds that the job is the most important and honored in the.

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The Giver Chapter 8 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

summary of the giver chapter 9

Jonas watches and listens as his classmates receive their Assignments. There is a total of eight rules on the sheet. After all the Assignments have been given out, the Chief Elder tells the crowd that she has skipped Jonas purposely. And if people are lying, then the community itself and its utopian ideals are also lies. He has been truly frightened only once before, when a plane flew off course over the community a year ago. Jonas is happy for his friend and feels that the Assignment suits Asher. He is disappointed that there will no longer be time for recreation in his schedule, and he is surprised to see that he will be exempt from the rules regarding rudeness.

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The Giver Summary Chapter 8 and 9

summary of the giver chapter 9

At the same time, although Jonas comforts himself, the fear to which he refers in the initial paragraph remains in the novel's suspenseful tone, and we come to echo Jonas's anticipation, which is made even stronger by the displacement of the community in time and space. He went to school, which was a bit awkward since he wasn't allowed to talk about his training. For the first time, the novel begins to explicitly discuss and weigh the relative values of Sameness and individuality. The Chief Elder presents a speech that details how this particular ceremony is the single time in which the differences between the children are celebrated; otherwise, it would be rude to point out how the children differ. Next, they comfort Mother after she relates a tale about a repeat offender who came before her at the Department of Justice for a second time, knowing that she is upset at the possibility of release should the man break the rules for a third time. Jonas understands immediately that this is another concept before Sameness and Climate Control, which pleases the old man since it shows Jonas's intelligence.

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Notes on Chapter 9 from The Giver

summary of the giver chapter 9

The last time someone was selected was ten years ago, and the selection had been a failure. The landscape becomes more and more filled with color, but Jonas grows hungry and tired. Neither of his parents knew what had happened to her. Blindly obedient, they apologize and accept apologies without thinking because they are following the rules. He knows the Receiver of Memory is a highly honored position in his community, but he also knows the previous selection failed. When the time comes for Jonas to receive his Assignment, the Chief Elder skips over his number with no explanation. Father recalls that when he was Eleven and waiting for the Ceremony of Twelve, he barely remembered anything other than the Ceremony of Nine, during which his sister got a bicycle.

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The Giver Chapters 7

summary of the giver chapter 9

He is not to discuss his dreams or accept medication for pain that has to do with his training. Everyday, Jonas is to report himself to the attendant at the behind the. For the first time, he experiences snow, and while part of him is still in the Annex, another part of him is sitting on a sled on top of a hill. This post is part of the series: The Giver: Novel Study Guide. Jonas' instructions do not allow any time for recreational activities, and what is most shocking to Jonas is that some of the instructions directly contradict the rules that he has followed throughout his life.

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The Giver Summary Chapter 8 and 9

summary of the giver chapter 9

However, the Elder announces that Jonas has actually been chosen for a special position: the Receiver of Memory. He had quickly been told that he was not starving, but was only hungry, and so saying he was starving was a lie. The Chief Elder, the elected leader of the community, gives a speech before the Ceremony, noting that it is the one time the community recognizes the differences between the children rather than ignoring them as is customary and polite. His younger sister goes first by explaining the anger that she felt today when someone from a visiting group of Sevens, or seven-year-olds, did not obey the rules about waiting in line. Along with the obvious changes in Jonas' life, such as the nameplate that is changed on his bicycle by the Maintenance Crew during the night, Lowry reveals details about the current Receiver's accommodations, called the Annex, that indicate that Jonas' life has dramatically changed and will never be the same.

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The Giver

summary of the giver chapter 9

He wonders if anyone else in his community is allowed to lie too. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. However, it prohibits him from discussing his training with anyone, telling his dreams, asking for any medication related to his training, and applying for release. After dinner, Jonas's family holds the customary ritual of the telling of feelings. Analysis Jonas learns almost immediately after the Ceremony of Twelve that the loneliness and sense of apartness predicted during the Ceremony will go beyond his training as the Receiver of Memory and enter all aspects of his life. Although some jobs are held in higher esteem than others, citizens are taught from early childhood to respect all professions and to treat others with respect. He cannot imagine lying, either, having been trained since childhood to speak with total precision and accuracy, even avoiding exaggeration and figures of speech.


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