The tone of sonnet 130. Sonnet 130 2019-01-18

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My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

the tone of sonnet 130

These are usually divided into four categories: histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances. Shakespeare talks about her hair, the color of her skin, etc. Shakespeare turns all these conventions upside down. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. Her breath is not particularly sweet-smelling 7—8 ; her voice is normal and not musical 8—9 ; her walk normal too, not like that of a supernatural goddess. In the first quatrain, the speaker spends one line on each comparison between his mistress and something else the sun, coral, snow, and wires—the one positive thing in the whole poem some part of his mistress is like. The former was a long narrative poem depicting the rejection of Venus by Adonis, his death, and the consequent disappearance of beauty from the world.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 130

the tone of sonnet 130

Although no one is sure whether the woman Shakespeare is talking about really existed, readers can see how well he uses this sonnet to skewer lame poetic clichés. . In writing this poem, he was gently poking fun at the conventional romantic poems that were being written by other poets. Only eighteen of Shakespeare's plays were published separately in quarto editions during his lifetime; a complete collection of his works did not appear until the publication of the First Folio in 1623, several years after his death. A more easier way to read the sonnet would be: My mistress' eyes are not as bright as the sun; Coral is more red than her lips; If snow is a white color, her breast are grayish brown and dull; Her hair is black and wire like; I have seen red and white roses, But these roses are not in her cheeks; Perfume smells better Than her bad breath' I love to hear her talk, however, Music sounds better; I admit I haven't seen a goddess go by; And from the way my mistress walks by i can tell she is not one; And yet, my love is more rare Than any girl with these false comparisons. The word was not used then with our heavily negative sense, but more neutrally. The rhetorical structure of Sonnet 130 is important to its effect.


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Sonnet 130 Speaker

the tone of sonnet 130

Maybe you've always thought that a love poem had to be sappy, like something you'd find in a Valentine's Day card. Historical Background was born in 1564 in Stratford-Upon-Avon to an alderman and glover. Of course, the custom was to say how beautiful and marvellous each feature was. Old love poems bring to mind flowery language and the kind of unrealistic glop that you could never bring yourself to say with a straight face. It is quite a stretch to reach this conclusion, and it is not the popular interpretation of the poem, however an argument can be made that the poetic speaker spends an inordinate amount of time describing his mistress down to the bare bones. Blonde was fashionable then, as now.

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Analysis of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

the tone of sonnet 130

In this sonnet, Shakespeare draws on sight, sound and smell when he compares his mistress' eyes to the sun, her lips to red coral, her breasts to white snow, her hair to black wires, her cheeks to red and white roses, her breath to perfume and her voice to music. This guy doesn't look at his love and tell her that her eyes are bluer than the sky, or any smarmy lies that are so common. During Shakespeare time he wrote famous plays, several poems and one hundred and fifty four exceptional shorter poems known as sonnets. So, yeah, he might drive people around him crazy. And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. A lifetime resident of New York, Christi O'Donnell has been writing about education since 2003.

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Shakespeare Sonnet 130

the tone of sonnet 130

Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 is a parody of the kind of insincere, sickly sweet love poems that authors have been writing and a lot of people have been hating for centuries. This alternating rhyme scheme marks out the three quatrains and then the ending couplet. More typically, modern versethat claims to be a sonnet but does not follow the fourteen lineconstruction would more accurately be a form of free verse. In ancient times, a mortal was supposed to be able to recognize a goddess by her particular manner of walking. In the couplet, then, the speaker shows his full intent, which is to insist that love does not need these conceits in order to be real; and women do not need to look like flowers or the sun in order to be beautiful. Or is he really just trading on their force? For example, it was not uncommon to read love poems that compared a woman to a river, or the sun.

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Shakespearean Sonnet 130 by Jessica Kaye on Prezi

the tone of sonnet 130

There are modern forms of the sonnet, offered by such notable poetsas Edna St. Orthodox opinion currently concludes that we do not know who they are or whether they existed. Whereas conventional love sonnets by other poets make their women into goddesses, in Sonnet 130 the poet is merely amused by his own attempt to deify his dark mistress. However, there is powerful evidence to suggest that the poem … s are substantially biographic in nature, describing the relationship of Shakespeare with his only known personal patron, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton see The Biography in Shakespeare's Sonnets at related link below. Contemporary poets, such as Sidney and Watson, would use the Petrarchan sonnet for its poetic form, whereas in Sonnet 130, Shakespeare mocks all the conventions of it. It is composedmuch like an English sonnet in three quatrains and a couplet, butmimics the Italian terza rima form by using a chain-linkedrhyme scheme.

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My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

the tone of sonnet 130

Most sonnet sequences in Elizabethan England were modeled after that of Petrarch. He's finally done it, but not without making fun of the whole idea of love poems. Shakespeare's sonnets were composed between 1593 and 1601, though not published until 1609. As easy might I from my self depart As from my soul which in thy breast doth lie. It was very customary, following the conventions set up by the Italian lyric poet Petrarch 1304—74 , to write sonnets praising the beauty of the woman you were in love with. Sonnet 130, while similar to other Shakespearean sonnets in the use of poetic devices and techniques, stands apart from most of his other sonnets for its mocking voice and use of satire.

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My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

the tone of sonnet 130

There are three traditional forms of sonnets, rather there are twoand a variant that makes the third and has commonly come to beaccepted as a third form. He is widely regarded as the greatest English writer of all time, and wrote 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and 38 plays, though recently another play has been found and attributed to William Shakespeare. Nonetheless, the poet admires her beauty, suggesting that she is really beautiful, but adamant that he is not going to be drawn into a game of falsely praising that beauty. Theoctave describes a problem, while the sestet provides a solution. Yet he thinks she is really beautiful nonetheless, and his admiration is intended to seem all the more real for being couched in realistic rather than conventional, exaggerated, or clichéd terms. Together they raised two daughters: Susanna, who was born in 1583, and Judith whose twin brother died in boyhood , born in 1585.

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